Rise in financial hardship for Hull University students

Rise in financial hardship for Hull University students

BBC |May 31, 2012

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The number of Hull University students facing financial hardship increased by 54% over the past four years, its union said.

The student union said 2,300 students had contacted its advisors for support last year compared to 1,500 in 2008.

About 22,000 students study at the university. Four years ago, there were 21,000.

The Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) said“generous packages of financial support” were available.

Gina Rayment, from Hull University’s student union, said:“They’re coming to us with quite serious problems such as possible rent arrears where they could actually lose a roof over their heads.”

Food parcels“It isn’t just that they need some money for a Friday night, it’s actually that they need money for food, they need money to pay their bills and they need money for rent.”

The union said there were a number of reasons why students were facing hardship including mismanagement of money or loss of parental incomes.

“One of the main reasons here in Hull is that there are no part-time jobs that students used to rely on to get themselves through university,” said Ms Rayment.

The rise in financial hardship has also led to an increase in the number of food parcels it provides to students.

Last year the union distributed 70 food parcels to students compared to 30 in 2008, the union said.

A spokesperson from BIS said: “There is a generous package of financial support to help with living costs in the form of loans and non-repayable grants.

“Our reforms will offer more financial support and lower monthly repayments once you are in well paid work.”

Five-term plan for Nottingham schools to be reconsidered

Five-term plan for Nottingham schools to be reconsidered

BBC |May 31, 2012

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Nottingham City Council has agreed to reconsider plans to switch to a five-term school year after talks with a teachers union.

The National Union of Teachers (NUT) opposed the changes, which included a shorter summer break, and held a series of strikes earlier this year.

Now the authority has said it will meet with all school trades unions to look at “alternative models”.

It follows talks between the two sides led by conciliation service Acas.

Nottingham City Council said altering the school year would boost attainment, but the NUT viewed the change as disruptive.

A joint statement said: “Following constructive discussions, under the auspice of Acas, over proposed changes to school terms and holidays pattern, it has been agreed that a further meeting will be called with all of the schools trade unions to look at alternative models of terms and holidays.

‘Progress made’“The outcome of these discussions will then be considered by executive councillors.

“The NUT has agreed to suspend any further industrial action while discussions are ongoing. Collective agreement on a way forward is still being pursued by all parties.”

David Mellen, portfolio holder for children’s services, said: “I am pleased that progress has been made in our aim to best meet the needs of our city children in the way our terms and holidays are arranged.”

Christine Blower, NUT general secretary, said: “I am pleased that the NUT has reached agreement which provides for all options to be considered, to form part of constructive negotiations which will now involve all unions representing school staff.”

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